What Is FIP In Cats?

Feline infectious peritonitis is a serious and often fatal viral disease in cats. It is important for all cat owners to be aware of the signs and symptoms of FIP and to seek veterinary treatment immediately if they suspect their cat may be infected.

Checkout this video:

What is FIP?

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease that affects cats. The virus that causes FIP is a member of the coronavirus family, which includes the viruses that cause colds and flu in humans. most cats infected with the virus do not develop FIP, but in some cases, the virus mutates and causes the disease.

FIP is a serious and often fatal disease, particularly in young cats. There is no cure for FIP, and treatment is typically only supportive. Even with treatment, many cats will die from the disease.

What are the symptoms of FIP?

Laboratory testing is the only way to diagnose FIP. Symptoms of FIP vary, depending on which form your cat has. Wet form symptoms can include:
-Fever
-Loss of appetite
-Weight loss
-Depression
-Eye inflammation and discharge
-Vomiting
-Diarrhea (often with blood)
-Enlarged lymph nodes
Dry form symptoms can include:
-Fever
-Loss of appetite
-Weight loss
-Depression
-Eye inflammation and discharge
– Neurological signs, such as wobbliness, head tilt, seizures

What are the causes of FIP?

There is no one definitive answer to this question. Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease of cats caused by infection with the feline coronavirus (FCoV). The disease can affect any age, breed, or gender of cat, but is most commonly seen in young kittens.

There are two types of FCoV: FCoV-1 and FCoV-2. FCoV-1 is the more common type and is found in approximately 30-40% of healthy cats. It is typically spread through close contact with other cats, such as in shelters or homes with multiple cats. infected cats may not show any signs of disease, but can still shed the virus in their saliva, feces, and urine.

FCoV-2 is less common, occurring in less than 5% of healthy cats. It is more likely to cause disease, and infected cats may show signs such as fever, loss of appetite, weight loss, and diarrhea. In some cases, FIP can lead to death. There is no specific treatment for FIP, so prevention is key. Vaccines are available for both types of FCoV, but they are not 100% effective.

How is FIP diagnosed?

A diagnosis of FIP is often made based on the cat’s combined clinical signs, history (including recent exposure to other cats with FIP), and test results. There is no one definitive test for FIP. Your veterinarian may recommend any or all of the following tests:

Complete blood count (CBC): may reveal a high white blood cell count with a high percentage of neutrophils.
Serum biochemistry profile: may reveal increases in liver enzymes and/or lack of appetite (anorexia) in affected cats.
Urinalysis: may be performed to evaluate kidney function and to look for evidence of a viral infection.
Radiographs (X-rays): may be recommended to help assess whether there is fluid accumulation in the chest or abdomen.
Abdominal ultrasound: this imaging technique can be used to evaluate the abdominal cavity for signs of effusion (fluid accumulation) around the intestines.
PCR testing: this test can be performed on blood, fluids, or tissues to detect the presence of coronavirus DNA. In theory, this test could be used to diagnose FIP; however, false positive results are common. Additionally, some cats who do not have FIP will test positive for coronavirus antibodies.

How is FIP treated?

There is no known cure for FIP, and treatment is typically focused on managing symptoms and supporting the cat’s overall health. In some cases, antiviral medications may be prescribed in an attempt to slow the progression of the disease. Treatment options will vary depending on the severity of the disease and the cat’s overall health.

What is the prognosis for cats with FIP?

While there is no cure for FIP, and it is almost always fatal, there are some treatment options that may improve your cat’s quality of life and extend their life span. Treatment options are mostly supportive and aim to relieve symptoms. Treatment cannot reverse the damage that has been done to the body by the virus, so it is important to start treatment as early as possible.

There is no one size fits all answer to the question of prognosis for cats with FIP. Each case is different, and will depend on a number of factors such as the severity of the disease, how quickly it progression, and how well the cat responds to treatment. In general, though, the outlook for cats with FIP is not good. The majority of cats who develop FIP will die from the disease, even with treatment.

Can FIP be prevented?

There is no vaccine available to prevent FIP, and there is no way to predict which cats will develop the disease. The best way to protect your cat is to make sure they are up to date on their vaccinations and routine vet care.

What is the current research on FIP?

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease of cats caused by infection with the feline coronavirus (FCV). The virus is found in the saliva, tears, and feces of infected cats, and can be spread through close contact with other cats, contaminated food and water bowls, or infected litter boxes. Kittens and young cats are most susceptible to infection, but the disease can occur in any age group.

Most cats infected with FCV will not develop FIP, but a small percentage (estimated to be between 1-5%) will go on to develop the disease. The exact cause of this transformation is not known, but it is thought to be related to a genetic predisposition in some cats. There is currently no cure for FIP and it is fatal in almost all cases.

There is currently no vaccine available for FIP, but there are some new experimental vaccines that show promise. In addition, keeping your cat up-to-date on their regular vaccinations (for example, against feline panleukopenia virus) may help to reduce their risk of developing FIP.

What are the resources for owners of cats with FIP?

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a viral disease that affects cats. There is no cure for FIP, and it is almost always fatal. However, there are some resources available for owners of cats with FIP.

The first step is to find a vet who is familiar with the disease and can provide the best possible care for your cat. There are a few specialized clinics that focus on FIP, and they may be able to offer more targeted treatment options. You can also search for “feline infectious peritonitis” on the website of the American Association of Feline Practitioners to find a list of vets who have registered as having an interest in treating the disease.

There are also a few organizations that provide support and information for owners of cats with FIP. The Feline Infectious Peritonitis Foundation offers financial assistance for owners who need help paying for vet bills, and they also have a helpline available to answer any questions about the disease. The Winn Feline Foundation also has information about FIP on their website, as well as a list of vets who have experience treating the disease.

Where can I find more information on FIP?

There is unfortunately no cure for FIP, and most cats will eventually die from the disease. However, there are some treatments that may help improve your cat’s quality of life and extend their life expectancy. If your cat has been diagnosed with FIP, talk to your veterinarian about treatment options and whether they are right for your cat. You can also find more information on FIP from the Winn Feline Foundation or the American Association of Feline Practitioners.

Scroll to Top